• Brian Lynch,M.D.

    19.95 Twelve Steps To Emotional Health (see below)

    KNOWING YOUR EMOTIONS-- ON AMAZON

    FACEBOOK-AFFECT PSYCHOLOGY

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    TWELVE STEPS TO JUSTICE


     

    We came to realize that we are profoundly emotional beings and that unless we understand our emotions we are very often powerless over our own actions and are powerless over the world.

    We came to believe that by coming to know our own powerful emotions we may maximize peace and justice in our lives.

    We made a decision to start on a path of understanding how our thinking and actions are often profoundly determined by our emotions past and present.

    We came to an understanding that only by taking a detailed emotional inventory, - an inventory of our anger, fear, distress, disgust and shame and by assessing what we are really interested in and what really makes us happy- will we truly be able to achieve justice and reparation for all.

    That we have expressed to others, when appropriate, and ourselves the exact nature of our feelings thereby gaining some power over them.

    By doing all of the above steps we naturally became ready to be accepting of the world and others as it is and as they are.

    By the above we came to accept ourselves as we are and to understand that we have done what we have done, and others have done what they have done, due to unmanageable feelings of hurt and thus it is counterproductive and damaging to blame ourselves or others.

    Made a list of all persons we have harmed and made an inventory of how we felt at the time we hurt them and made amends when appropriate.

    We have tried to understand why and how we felt the way we did and why and how others felt as they did thus understanding why we and others acted as we and they did.

    We have come to understand that everyone feels before they think. We have worked towards understanding that others, like ourselves, have trouble controlling emotions and thus, often what they do.

    We have continued to think about our basic emotions, daily if possible. We have come to know each emotion in our own personal way. We have monitored ourselves for feelings of guilt and when we do things that hurt others we look to what we were feeling at the time, thereby, avoiding feelings of guilt, understanding ourselves better, as well as making amends to those we have hurt.

    Having come to know our emotional lives we have gained the ability to employ our interest and experience in a new type of interaction with others, one of mutual interest that will lead us to maximize joy in our lives. In this way justice is always a healing process.

    Brian Lynch 2001